[Top 5] Best Drum for Kids

Choosing a drum set might prove to be a challenge for parents – mostly because you’re not a drummer yourself and loop or shell sizes don’t mean anything to you. So it’s possible to spend hours searching for a drum set and still end up not knowing what brand or product best suits your kid. We’re going to look at 5 highly rated junior drum sets and their specs so that you have a good starting point when purchasing.

This list includes both 3-piece and 5-piece sets based on their popularity among buyers (who are not necessarily musicians).

Top 5 Best Drum Set for Kids

1. The Ludwig Junior Drum Set

Ludwig Junior Outfit Drum Set Wine Red (Wine Red)
Price: $299.00
6 new from $299.000 used

Ludwig is the biggest name in this particular under-age drum set guide and many of their kits are endorsed by famous drummers. Part of what makes their sets more special is that the hardware is of a fairly higher quality than some of the lesser-known brands.

A lot of these drum sets need to be tuned before they start to produce any decent sound. It’s the same case with the Ludwig. But even though the cymbals sound bad initially, your child probably won’t care. They’re more interested in having fun than listening to quality sound.

The Ludwig offers the following:

· Stronger hardware – its more durable than many of its counterparts

· Cymbals – they don’t sound very good (as is the case with any beginner drum set) but they sound slightly better than the Gammon or Mendini cymbals.

Cons:

· Low-quality cymbals

· Only for kids up to 5 feet

2. The Gammon Percussion Junior Drum Set

The Gammon brand is not known outside of drumming circles but the drums have decent sound. But as with the Ludwig, the secret is tuning. In terms of quality and durability, the Gammon doesn’t compare to the Ludwig. It comes apart after a while and if your kid beats on it relentlessly every day, then it might fall apart even faster than expected.

The features include:

· Full set including stool, pedals, and sticks

· Fairly decent drum sound

· It comes in 4 different colors including pink for girls

Cons:

· Average-quality cymbals

· Only works for children up to 5 feet

3. Sound Percussion Labs Lil Kicker: 3 Piece

It’s a simple set that has garnered positive reviews from parents who bought it for kids aged 5 and below. Most buyers appreciate the snare and bass sound, and even though it comes in a single braced hardware, most buyers report that it’s tough and durable for children.

The full set includes:

· Hi-hats

· Kick pedals

· Sticks

· Crash/ride cymbal

· Drum tuning key

· User instructions

Pros:

· Good starter kit for toddlers

· Good sound

· Sturdy hardware

Cons:

· Weak cymbals

· Best for kids under 5

4. GP Percussion GP55: 5 Piece

This drum kit has good ratings and it offers solid performance for kids. The sound isn’t perfect or professional, but it does a good job of keeping the kids busy making noisy sounds.

The features include:

· 4 lugs for all the drums

· Single braced hardware

· Throne/stool

· Hi-hat cymbals

· Drum key

· Drum sticks

· 10” snare

· 16” drums

· All hardware included

While the unit makes above average sounds, it has been reported that some of the hardware isn’t of high quality as would have been expected. Also, many buyers reported that instructions included in the set were not for this particular drum. Overall, it’s one of the kits you buy to keep your kid busy without worrying too much about the details.

5. GP Percussion GP50

This is a simple yet highly rated 3-set drummer kit in the market. One of the main reasons people appreciate is the quick setup and simplicity of design. But while some people say it’s easy to set up, a few people say the opposite. However the people who find assembly simple and straightforward outnumber those who have a problem setting up.

The features include:

· Hi-hats

· 5 lug tom

· Throne/stool

· Drum sticks

· 10” snare

· 16” X 11”bass drum

· Single braced hardware

Pros

· Easy setup – for majority of buyers

· Fairly tough hardware

· Good for 8 year olds or younger

Cons

· Cymbals are of low quality

· Parts are not labeled

What to Look for in a Kid’s Drum

· Age group – this is hard to specify because a 6 year old kid could be any size and in general these drums are designed for kids between 3-10 years. For kids who are taller than average (or older than 10) the best option would be to purchase a full-size kit.

· Some types of drum sets include hi-hats to help the kid learn to play. Other items that may be included are 1 crash cymbal, a bass/kick drum, a snare, 1 tom, and a throne or stool to sit on. A 5-piece set is ideal because it provides the kid a better grounding in essential drumming techniques and this is perfect in case they get serious about it.

· A 5-piece drum set means the complete set of items includes five drums. Aside from the drums, the other pieces such as cymbals are not counted. Therefore, a 5-piece set would include 3 toms, a kick drum, and snare.

· Drum sticks usually come with the complete set but not always. Buyers find it frustrating to receive a drum set without sticks but it is possible to purchase them separately online. To give your kid more options, purchase two separate sets of sticks with different weights.

· Drum sizes are measured first by diameter, and then depth. This means that a snare measuring 10” x 5” is described as ten inches in diameter and five inches deep. Keep in mind that some manufacturers state these measurements the other way around.

· The most important thing to consider is whether your child can reach the cymbal and the bass drum pedal, two pieces that make up the highest and lowest points. As long as he/she measures between 2ft and 5ft then it should be okay. If they’re any taller you’d need to purchase a full-size kit to prevent unhealthy squatting.

As you set out to buy a drum set for your little one, you may find that the only thing that moves you to select one product over another is as trivial as the color. This is because manufacturers have designed these small beginner-drums to be almost identical. Much of the technology that goes towards creating beginner drums is rudimentary so buyers shouldn’t expect too much from these kid drums.

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